Who Killed the American Family? By Phyllis Schlafly

Posted By on June 26, 2015

Commentator Micah Clark caught lesbian journalist Masha Gessen on a radio program admitting that homosexual activists are not merely trying to access the institution of marriage — they want to radically redefine and eventually eliminate marriage. Here are Gessen’s words:

It’s a no-brainer that [homosexual activists] should have the right to marry, but I also think equally that it’s a no-brainer that the institution of marriage should not exist… Fighting for gay marriage generally involves lying about what we are going to do with marriage when we get there — because we lie that the institution of marriage is not going to change, and that is a lie. The institution of marriage is going to change, and it should change. 22

After Canada legalized same-sex marriage, there was no rush down the aisle to the altar. Out of34,200 self-identified homosexual couples, only 1.4 percent obtained marriage licenses. The editor of Fab, a popular gay magazine in Toronto, explained, “I’d be for marriage if I thought gay people would challenge and change the institution and not buy into the traditional meaning of ‘till death do us part’ and monogamy forever.” 24 The 1984 McWhirter-Mattison study reported in The Male Couple that most homosexual couples with relationships lasting more than five years incorporated a provision for outside sexual activity.

Who Killed the American Family? Explains why and how feminists, judges, lawmakers, psychologists, college professors and courses, government incentives and disincentives, and Democratic politicians seeking votes oppose the traditional American nuclear family as we knew it and as it was depicted on TV fifty years ago. Each antifamily act may seem minor, but added up, those acts and events are changing America for the worse. It is time to reverse the tide.

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