Why We’re So Obsessed With Will and Kate

Posted By on May 2, 2014

will and kate

I’ve been trying to put my finger on what, exactly, is so appealing about Prince William, Dutchess Kate, and Prince George’s royal tour Down Under.

There is the usual. Her amazing wardrobe and corresponding poise. His dapper looks. The stunning scenery of New Zealand vineyards or Australian metropolises. Baby George’s chubby cheeks. Yes, all that.

But there is something else.

It’s watching a young family.

A family.

It’s no secret than we are increasingly a rarity. Young families that is. The percent of young Americans getting married dropped by ten percent in just a decade and sits at an all-time low. Birth-rates everywhere are plunging, and the average age at which a college woman now has her first child is 30 and climbing. The majority of children born to women under 30 are born out of wedlock. Everyone talks of a delayed adolescence among millennials, one of whose favorite television shows of all time is called, of all things, Arrested Development. There are a million little data points that paint a picture of today’s 20 and 30-somethings partying, shacking up, moving back home, hooking up, etcetera. I’m not breaking any news here.

The choice to marry and have children, especially in urban areas, is increasingly a counter-cultural one. One that can feel isolating, especially when children come and catching up with friends requires a flurry of (usually unsuccessful) phone calls to sitters and an expensive babysitter tab. Whereas once people formed communities around families, now they are built around child-free entities like restaurants, yoga studios, and office complexes.

Read the rest here

Recommended Resources
Family Reformation: The Legacy of Sola Scriptura in Calvin’s Geneva
Building a God-Centered Family, A Father’s Manual
Building a Godly Home, Volume 1: A Holy Vision for Family Life
Start Your Family: Inspiration for Having Babies

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