In Bed with Radical Feminists: The U.N.’s Misguided Women’s Agenda

Posted By on June 4, 2011

This excellent piece details why feminism is not addressing the real needs–tied to basic human rights–of women around the world. Feminism is often silent when it comes to real abuses of women (like female genital mutilation, religious “honor killings,” etc.). These abuses are best answered by a call for basic human rights and dignity as granted by our Creator (this is what LAF stands for). Yet feminism continues to focus almost exclusively on “reproductive health” and “sexual rights,” which are really tied to lifestyle choices and not to human rights.

From the halls of the United Nations at Turtle Bay to its expansive buildings in Geneva, radical feminism is among the predominant views dictating social policy and programs. Feminists lead their international agenda from the new United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women, known as “UN Women,” often in partnership with a host of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from the U.S. and Europe that espouse a radical social agenda. In turn, NGOs such as the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Advocates for Youth, and the Center for Health and Gender Equity swarm to U.N. meetings and use them as forums to perpetuate their agenda.

Alarmingly, this radical feminist agenda reduces the diverse economic, political, and social needs of women around the world to issues of sexuality and fertility. At the U.N., nearly every conversation, forum, and program that purports to be concerned with women has a monomaniacal focus on such matters as sexual rights, reproductive health, contraception, and abortion.

Read the entire piece HERE. [Not for young readers.]

About The Author

Mrs. Chancey is the mother of 12 children, all of whom keep the household bubbling with life, learning, and levity. Jennie co-founded LAF in 2002 with Lydia Sherman and has been delighted to hear from women all over the world who enjoy their femininity and love to cultivate womanly virtues.

Comments

7 Responses to “In Bed with Radical Feminists: The U.N.’s Misguided Women’s Agenda”

  1. Gina_B says:

    An interesting article about the silence of UN Women on important female issues. Unfortunately, they really do believe those are the most important issues and imparting their Western secular values on cultures that celebrate fertility and family is the right thing to do. It’s incredibly ethnocentric. I also find it insulting to women that they believe abortion is our best option when faced with difficult circumstances, be they physical, economic, emotional, environmental, etc. Are women strong enough to carry and raise a child or aren’t we? We may need assistance, and there’s nothing wrong with that, but assuming that we are so weak we cannot handle an “inconvenient” pregnancy is sexist; it is not sexist to respect and nurture the life we’ve been given and ask for help when needed.

    I wanted to ask you about a sentence you wrote at the beginning of this article:

    “Feminism is often silent when it comes to real abuses of women (like female genital mutilation, religious “honor killings,” etc.).”

    Can I ask you to unpack that statement for me? I’ve recently been doing a study of feminism and I have encountered prominent feminists, such as Gloria Steinem and Jane Fonda, as well as reading current feminist blog sites, that do discuss issues such as female genital mutilation (FGM) and honor killings (as well as espousing the more troublesome agenda of abortion and “sexual liberation”). Were you just stating that feminists tend to emphasize issues such as sexuality and abortion more than they discuss other important issues, such as FGM? I mean no disrespect and ask only because I want this website to be as accurate as possible.

  2. Jenn84 says:

    “Feminism is often silent when it comes to real abuses of women (like female genital mutilation, religious “honor killings,” etc.). These abuses are best answered by a call for basic human rights and dignity as granted by our Creator (this is what LAF stands for). Yet feminism continues to focus almost exclusively on “reproductive health” and “sexual rights,” which are really tied to lifestyle choices and not to human rights”

    Amen. I always want to ask the liberal Marxists on “The View”, “Why are you whining about Christians and conservatives? Why aren’t you drilling your beloved Muslims about abuse of women? Their Bible says it’s okay to beat rebellious wives!”

  3. Thanks for the comment, Gina. There are scattered feminists who do address these issues, but you won’t find them in prominent positions in feminist literature or at a NOW conference. The underlying reason seems to be that criticizing FGM and honor killings involves criticizing another religion (Islam, mainly), and that is a no-no in the West, where we are constantly told Islam is a religion of peace and has a place for women. Living in Africa and witnessing the results of Islamic teaching up close, I am more than willing to stick out my neck and say “it ain’t so.” We must approach these issues from an objective standpoint, but feminism is highly subjective, which is why, for example, you find both pro-pornography and anti-pornography, pro-abortion and pro-life groups in the same feminist tent. You can’t be pro-Islam and pro-feminism at the same time, though, so feminists pretty much have their hands tied if they want to argue for total religious tolerance in one breath and against the results of Islamic teaching on women in the next. Do all Muslims carry out the teachings of Islam on women? Not at all. But what Islam teaches about women is antithetical to what God says about them in Scripture. Our human worth and dignity are intrinsic and given by our Creator, so we should be fearless when it comes to standing up for women undergoing torture and even death in the name of a false religion. So where is the widespread feminist outrage over these very real and terrifying abuses of women? They make what feminists claim women “suffer” in the West look utterly petty and inconsequential.

  4. MuseMama says:

    Jennie, I respectfully disagree with you. I’m no where near a radical feminist, nor do I claim to speak for anyone. But FGM and Honor Killings while often practiced by one certain religion, are not actually religious matters, but cultural traditions.

    I see no evidence that feminists are being silent on this issue, but quite the opposite. And while I appreciate your views on the sanctity of life (something that I believe in as well) I recognize that the reason feminists focus on reproductive health is not to encourage the abortion of babies, but to provide women with an opportunity to become educated and improve their economic status, which can be difficult when you’re having many babies in poverty.

    I’d really like you to unpack your statement further. Can you offer some examples of prominent feminists or feminist organizations that are not talking about these issues, or doing something about them?

    Thank you in advance.

  5. Jenn84 says:

    Btw: The NYC president of NOW, as well as a liberal feminist actress, have defended Anthony Weiner.

    ???

  6. Thanks for your patience in awaiting a reply. We’ve had no Internet for two weeks, so I’m a bit behind.

    Can you define “culture” for me? Henry van Til famously stated that “Culture is religion externalized,” meaning that culture grows from what we worship or hold most dear and close as a people. Our practices grow from our beliefs. So, yes, FGM grows out of culture, but that culture is informed and shaped by religious belief. I didn’t mean to imply that Islam was the religion behind FGM. It’s actually paganism that is largely responsible. And the word “paganism” covers a lot of ground. Here in Kenya we have witch doctors, animists, and pagans of all stripes. Same in Sudan. Islam doesn’t practice FGM as far as I know. It is more responsible for so-called “honor killings” in families where a daughter is raped or behaving “too western” for her family’s belief system (which usually involves modern dress, makeup, refusal to wear a burka, etc.). And, again, not all Muslims follow these beliefs, but when we see them here, Muslims most often take credit for them.

    The real problem with FGM is that it is practiced 99% of the time by WOMEN on girls — not by men. I highly recommend Halima Bashir’s book, Tears of the Desert, in which she describes how her female relatives held her down and subjected her to this torture, telling her all the time it was a great privilege and a gateway into womanhood. Halima’s father walked away, saying he was helpless to stop it. It is really hard for feminists to wrestle with a female-practiced form of oppression. An article in the Daily Nation this week in Nairobi highlighted the responses of school children to FGM. Many declared it was a bad thing, but almost all agreed that girls see it as a way to become adults and sexually active. Several noted that girls who have had FGM often take it as a sign they are ready for babies and end up dropping out of school when they get pregnant. So challenging FGM involves changing hearts on a fundamental level–not passing laws. The grandmothers and mothers will just break the laws to keep their time-honored religious “traditions.” There are dozens and dozens of missions organizations here in Kenya working with women on a one-on-one level and in villages to shed the light of the gospel on this very area.

    As for providing evidence that feminists and feminist organizations are “not talking” about these issues or doing something about them, the burden of proof is really the other way around. If you Google “feminist response to Islamic honor killing” (or “Hindu honor killing” or just “honor killing”), you get a whole lot of hits for feminist articles on how important it is not to be “Islamophobic” or jump to conclusions, but mostly cricket chirping when it comes to condemning this practice pointedly. There is exactly one statement on NOW about honor killings and one statement about FGM. Both advocate passing laws in the US but say nothing about what can be done overseas in other cultures. (I will post links as soon as I can get my other computer with all my bookmarks back online.) Again, I believe this points once again to the fact that the solutions are not legal at all. They are heart-centered. You cannot force people to give up core beliefs and practices by outlawing them. They will just cheat the law to continue practicing them. This is, at its heart, a religious problem. Christianity protects women’s human rights and accords them honor. When Christianity goes into pagan areas and sees hundreds and thousands of people convert and leave their pagan practices behind, the lot of women improves exponentially. This has been true since the Greco-Roman era (read Alvin Schmidt’s excellent How Christianity Changed the World and Charles Schmidt’s 19th-century book, The Social Results of Early Christianity, which cover this topic).

    I’ll post a bunch of links as soon as I can get my laptop back online. Being without Internet is normal in Kenya; it just means a lot of catch-up when we finally get online!

  7. Oops. I see I missed one point. You wrote, “And while I appreciate your views on the sanctity of life (something that I believe in as well) I recognize that the reason feminists focus on reproductive health is not to encourage the abortion of babies, but to provide women with an opportunity to become educated and improve their economic status, which can be difficult when you’re having many babies in poverty. ”

    The problem is that feminist organizations like Planned Parenthood and Marie Stopes “help” women improve their economic status by urging them not to have children (or to abort ones they cannot care for). This is hardly compassionate or helpful in the long-term. The high maternal death rate here means women need better access to HEALTH CARE–not to abortion and birth control services. Marie Stopes pushes abortion so hard in Kenya (where it is illegal, incidentally) that women are made to feel it is the only way they can better their situations. Christian organizations like the Revival Medical Center in the Kibera slum are offering excellent prenatal, birthing, and postnatal care to women for free (this is one of the ministries we actively help here). They also provide a free school with meals for orphans and help widows to find work (such as sewing and bookkeeping for the school, allowing them to keep their children with them while they work). That’s far more helpful than just encouraging women not to have children.

    As I’ve said before, “Follow the money.” Planned Parenthood and other pro-abortion organizations do not make money by helping women to enjoy healthy pregnancies, carry their babies to term, and follow up on their postnatal health. George Grant’s book, Grand Illusions, is heavily footnoted and covers exactly this issue. PP makes its money on birth control (with a high failure rate) and abortion. Former Planned Parenthood director Abby Johnson has also detailed this in her recent book and several testimonies given before state legislatures.

%d bloggers like this: