Office Hours: Girlie Christianity, Part 1

Posted By on June 11, 2010

From this week’s Boundless webzine newsletter:

Let me be clear: I appreciate women. Whether in the home or the marketplace or government or church, women have contributed much to their communities.

But it’s also become clear that there seems to be an imbalance in many churches, an imbalance that has alienated many men. Sentimental “worship” songs, offered in a key too high for men to sing. Sermons that appeal to women but to which men have a hard time relating. Images portraying Jesus as soft and feminine, rather than rough and masculine. Bulletins with clipart seemingly picked out by your grandmother. It a wonder more men don’t disengage from service and leadership.

J. Budziszewski begins a discussion in his featured article, “Girlie Christianity,” that addresses these issues. Whether you’ve experienced this phenomenon or not, maybe click over for a read to get his take on it.

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About The Author

Jennie is the wife of Matthew and mother of ten children, all of whom keep the household bubbling with life, learning, and levity. Jennie co-founded LAF in 2002 with Lydia Sherman and has been delighted to hear from women all over the world who enjoy their femininity and love to cultivate womanly virtues.

Comments

2 Responses to “Office Hours: Girlie Christianity, Part 1”

  1. ladyscott says:

    What great points! I remember a time sitting in my church, looking around at the congregants and realizing that the women out number the men at least 4 to 1 and the men in the congregation were mostly elderly. For what it’s worth, most of the women were elderly, too. I prayed for strong, Godly, young, family men to enter the church. The church was turning into a girlie, grandparent’s club! Well, I wasn’t the only one praying and God answered!

    I remember visiting one church that did have a lot of young families in it, but the whole service was so touchy-feely and emotion driven. The men either looked very uncomfortable or effeminate. It was a very youth-driven church, too as the teenage boys and girls ran up to the platform at one point and danced with the youth pastor to some silly song about “luvin’ Jesus.”

    This isn’t meat and potatoes of the gospel! This isn’t even milk! It’s kool-aid Christianity! I thank God so much for my church where my pastor always taught us the TRUTH.

  2. Mary R. says:

    Those are good points. I’ve always thought Christianity was portrayed as “girlie,” with those pictures of Jesus that look effeminite, with long flowing hair, etc. I really dislike pictures like that, because pictures are not authorized in the Bible, and nobody knows what Jesus really looked like.

    They say that when Protestants broke from the Catholic church and left the veneration of Mary behind, was when the effeminite pictures of Jesus started — a kind of replacement for the venerated femininity of Mary. Don’t know if that is true or not. Seems people instinctively but wrongly want a feminine person to venerate or even worship.

    I have also found that once you put women in positions of spiritual leadership in the church (pastors, elders, deacons), pretty soon the church fills up with women and it becomes a petticoat church: the men don’t like to come then. You must let men be in the lead when it comes to these spiritual things, like the Bible says. It also helps to have male ushers and men to take up the collection, too, and to be on the board of trustees whenever possible, for the same reason.

    You are right about the music, too, and the too-high-pitched songs.

    The church services you mention sound apalling (dancing to silly ditties and such).

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