My Father’s Story: How a Small Kindness Can Make a Lifelong Impact

Posted By on December 7, 2011

Michelle Duggar has a great post up over at Parentables:

There are a lot of reasons why serving the community is important to me, but one of them has to do with my father. His father died when he was 4 years old and my father’s mother had four babies all under the age of 5, all born pretty close together. And this was when our country was going through the Great Depression and things were so bad. There wasn’t work, so my father’s mother put the kids in a children’s home so that they could at least have meals and food to survive.

I’m sure there are a lot of stories like that from the Great Depression. But I remember my daddy telling me about the years that he spent in the children’s home. When Grandma remarried she took the children back and they had a home again. But for eight years, from 4 to 12, my father lived in a children’s home. And his mama would come and visit him and his siblings all the time and did what she could to provide for them, but she was barely surviving herself.

My dad said the one thing he never forgot was that the Salvation Army would bring the kids a gift for Christmas. The kids worked hard in the children’s home – the boys would dig ditches or go out and work in the community – and the only present that they got for Christmas was the gift that was given by the Salvation Army people, and he never forgot this kindness and always appreciated the Salvation Army for what they did when he was a little boy.

Read the entire piece HERE.

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About The Author

Jennie is the wife of Matthew and mother of ten children, all of whom keep the household bubbling with life, learning, and levity. Jennie co-founded LAF in 2002 with Lydia Sherman and has been delighted to hear from women all over the world who enjoy their femininity and love to cultivate womanly virtues.

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